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DSC_0822Tia-Mona Greene, the Pioneer’s Photography Editor from 2013-2015, plans to pursue her masters degree in higher education with a focus on student affairs, with the goal of working in a university Student Life department. She enjoyed working on the Pioneer for two years. It gave her a chance to do what she loves, which is photography, as well as to give other photographers more opportunities. She said that being able to provide her staff of photographers with the chance to continuously be published in an official newspaper “was the best feeling anyone could experience.”

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58890_10152229108083417_491640067_nDani Naess Hellesund, the Pioneer’s Opinions Editor for 2014-2015, and before that a Staff Writer, is currently working as a Fundraiser for the Norwegian Red Cross in Bergen, Norway. He works mostly with the emergency response and relief program and his job is to inform people and get donors to raise money for the Red Cross and the work they do in the many disaster areas around the world. He said, “Getting a degree in journalism was one of the best decisions I ever made. The reason for that is that you can work in so many interesting and varied places, and you learn skills that are relevant to most jobs. Eventually, I might build onto my bachelors in journalism with a masters in political science so that I can work in the field with a big humanitarian organization like the Red Cross. It is not a necessity to have a master’s degree to work in the field, but it gives you an edge in the extremely competitive international aid worker environment.”

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By Chloé Margulis
Staff Writer

There are three things you will learn about Argentina: first, there is an abundance of delicious steak; second, there is an abundance of different empanadas, which will become your snack food; and third, there is no such thing as a glass of wine half empty. I discovered all of this on my first day in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

LIU Group in Teatro Colon
LIU Group in Teatro Colon

On May 12, LIU Post honors students and faculty embarked on a 10 day journey to discover the history of tango in Buenos Aires. Music professor Stephanie Watt organized this trip as part of an honors course about the history of tango. The purpose of the trip is to continue learning the history of the tango dance by immersing students and faculty in the rich culture of tango’s capital.

We spent the first day exploring an area called Recoleta, a section of Buenos Aires, home to Parisian inspired architecture and the society’s elite. That evening, our wonderful guide Alberto brought us to the El Viejo Almacen tango house, where we were treated to a wonderful dinner of Argentinian steak, empanadas, and unlimited wine, followed by a narrative and sensual tango show.

“I could feel the energy among our group at the formal dinner before the show,” Professor Stephanie Watt said. “At that moment I knew that this tour was going to be an experience of a lifetime.

The stage was small, shared by an incredible band, 2 singers, and 4 couples. What separated this show from others was the intimate and emotional exchange between the dancers, musicians, and audience. The dancers engaged with us as we sat two feet from the stage sipping on our champagne. When a new song would begin, the audience would take a single breath with the dancers before they broke into the rhythmic art of the traditional Argentine tango.

The second day was considered our “touristy” day. One stop was to visit a famous metal flower on the outskirts of town. The metal flower is a structure in Argentina that at night, the petals close, and in the morning, the petals open, all depending on the position of the sun. When we saw it, the flower was in the midst of restoration because of a petal malfunction.

Some of the gang posing in front of the Flower Sculpture in Buenos Aires
Some of the gang posing in front of the Flower Sculpture in Buenos Aires

Shortly after our city tour, we visited the most famous opera house in Buenos Aires called Teatro Colon. During the tour, we sat in the most elite box in the house straight across from the stage where we witnessed auditions for an upcoming show. The unique thing about this opera house is that the acoustics are so incredible that voices and instruments are naturally amplified to bounce off the gold gilded dome ceiling. Microphones are not needed, so that any viewer can hear crystal clear from anywhere in the opera house.

When one of the sopranos sang a subito pianissimo it gave me goose bumps,” Watt said.

The last stop on the itinerary was La Boca, which is home of the most colorful streets in Argentina. On this strip of cobblestones, people danced tango and merchants sold hand crafted items. The surrounding buildings were the colors of the rainbow.

That evening, Professor Watt and Christopher Morrison, LIU alumni and flutist, performed together at the Academia Nacional del Tango.

“The excitement that I had felt at that moment acknowledging these facts is beyond words,” Watt said of the experience. “It wasn’t until Christopher and I played the last notes of our encore, Angel by Astor Piazzola that the release of this energy overwhelmed me. I never dreamt that one day I would be performing in this renowned institution as a classical artist much less receiving an honorary degree.”

A celebratory dinner was to be held at a famous meat house that midnight.

These were just our first adventures in Buenos Aires, a city that definitely never sleeps. With finishing dinner past midnight, then exploring the streets and local nightlife hotspots, our days and nights were filled with rich experiences.

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By Angela Alfano
News Editor

On the second floor of the Woodbury Country Club, a dining hall was filled with established journalists on Thursday evening, June 4. Being honored at the Press Club of Long Island’s Annual Media Awards were not only journalists from News 12 and Newsday, among other local media outlets, but also student journalists from the LIU Post Pioneer. LIU Post was one of the few universities recognized at this prestigious event.

Kristen Linsalata, co-editor-in-chief of the Pioneer, holding her PCLI award, with the Pioneer's News Editors Brian Riley and Angela Alfano
Kristen Linsalata, co-editor-in-chief of the Pioneer, holding her PCLI award, with the Pioneer’s News Editors Brian Riley and Angela Alfano

Kristen Linsalata, a senior English major who is the current editor-in-chief of The Pioneer, and Dorianna Valerio, former editor-in-chief of The Pioneer and now a Desk Assistant at CBS News Radio, were recognized in the Breaking News: Student category for the article “Women Are Running LIU Post,” published by the Pioneer on February 13, 2014. Linsalata was the writer of the article and Valerio was the editor.

Linsalata said that she is grateful for not only being a part of the PCLI Awards Dinner but to also have been recognized for doing something she loves to do. “It was a sobering and humbling experience to be in a room with such accredited professionals in the field as well as fellow students who are also being recognized,” Linsalata said.

“Writing for The Pioneer and being a part of the editorial team has changed the trajectory of my life and career and I couldn’t be more thankful to my family, friends, our advisor Carolyn Levin, and the rest of the Pioneer and the Bottom Line staff, and my professors here at LIU Post for believing in me,” she said.

Valerio said that she is very proud of Linsalata for her article and being recognized for her work. “I’m so happy that this is another year that The Pioneer is being recognized,” Valerio said. “We really have a great staff and a lot of hardworking writers, so I’m just proud that people see that!”

Valerio said what she would tell young journalists to enjoy this time as writers for their college newspaper as much as possible. She said that although there may be things student journalists do not like doing, such as going up to strangers and interviewing them, it will pay off in the long run.

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By Michael Otero
Sports Editor

On Friday, May 8, the softball team traveled to Manchester, New Hampshire to do battle with the Knights from Queens College in the first round of the NCAA East Region II Championship Tournament. Powered by sophomore pitcher Ashley Martin, the Pioneers punched their ticket to the next round.

Photo by Kimberly Toledo
Photo by Kimberly Toledo

The lone scoring inning for both teams came in the second with the Pioneers at the plate. After a single by junior catcher Paige Swantek, junior infielder Maria Palmeri gave the Pioneers a two-run cushion with a home run to dead centerfield. Martin tossed seven innings of shutout ball while striking out eight and walking none.

The Pioneers returned to the diamond once again on Saturday, May 9, but this time against the Penmen at Southern New Hampshire University. The Pioneers were again led by incredible pitching as they ended up beating the hosts by a score of 1-0.

The lone run came off the bat of sophomore infielder Kayla McCoy, who sent a solo shot to left field. Martin, one day removed from her impressive performance against the Knights, tossed another gem as she went the distance allowing only one hit and striking out two.

Photo by Kimberly Toledo
Photo by Kimberly Toledo

The final set of weekend games for the Pioneers was played on Sunday, May 10, against the same Penmen from Southern New Hampshire, but the stakes were different this time with the sub-region title on the line.

The Penmen got on the board first with a bases loaded walk which forced in a run in the fourth inning. The Pioneers evened up the scoring in the seventh inning on an RBI single from senior outfielder Samantha Miller.

The contest remained tied at one and extra innings were needed to decide a winner. In those extra innings, the Penmen had the last say as they won the game on a homer by junior infielder Lindsey Bolduc. Junior pitcher Isabella Corrao went 6.2 innings while striking out five and allowing just one run for LIU Post.

Photo by Kimberly Toledo
Photo by Kimberly Toledo

In the third game between these two teams in two days, the Pioneers suffered the same fate, losing 3-2 in a hard fought battle. Miller added an RBI in the second game as well as senior catcher Aly Dzierzynski. The Penmen, down by a run in the late innings, got help from the LIU defense for their last two runs of the game and ended up taking the game, title, and spot in the NCAA East Super Regional.

Head softball coach Jamie Apicella and his squad went an impressive 31-17-1 for the year and will look to build on their success for next season

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By Michael Otero
Sports Editor

On Wednesday, Apr. 29, the top seeded LIU Post men’s lacrosse team met the fourth-seeded Lions from Molloy College in the East Coast Conference (ECC) Semifinals at Bethpage Federal Credit Union Stadium in Brookville, N.Y.

The Pioneers, eager to get going, opened up the scoring in the first quarter and tacked on three more goals to take a commanding 4-0 lead early on. Junior attackman Matt Bellando provided the first goal and also assisted on two of the other three tallies in the quarter. Senior attackman Chris Caiazza and junior midfielder Anthony Berardis each added goals of their own during that span as well.

Photo credit: Kimberly Toledo
Photo credit: Kimberly Toledo

In the second quarter, the Lions responded with two goals in a sixty second span to cut the lead to 4-2. With the momentum seemingly hanging in the balance, the Pioneers grabbed it when the tag-team of senior midfielder Connor Drost and Caiazza each scored just 30 seconds apart. Going into the break, the Pioneers led 9-5 over the Lions.

The Pioneers put all hopes of a comeback to rest in the second half as they racked up goal after goal and got a great performance at the other end by junior goalie Adam Winne. Winne made a game-high 15 saves en route to the 15-7 victory, while senior defenseman Dan Jeannotte earned his first collegiate goal.

The Pioneers returned to the field on Saturday, May 2, when they played the Bears from NYIT in the ECC Championship game in Brookhaven, N.Y. The Pioneers were victorious and won their second straight conference title.

After an early strike by the Bears, the Pioneers responded with three unanswered goals to grab a 3-1 lead. Bellando tallied back-to-back goals in that span while Drost followed with an unassisted goal. In the second quarter, it had to feel like déjà vu for the Bears as they struck first to cut the lead to 3-2, but were quickly silenced with another three goal spurt for LIU Post. The Bears stayed strong however, and managed to pull to 7-5 at halftime.

The Bears drew first blood once again in the third quarter, but the Pioneers continued the theme on the afternoon of responding to adversity. They answered that tally by sophomore attacker Thomas Hughes with four straight goals to go ahead 11-6. In that span, Berardis netted a goal and provided two assists.

Both sides scored a couple more goals, but the Bears never really posed a threat to the Pioneers late in the game. When the clock hit triple zeroes, the Pioneers found themselves 14-9 winners and ECC Champions for the second straight year.

Junior attackman Matty Beccaris led all players with six points while Berardis tallied two goals and two assists for a four-point effort. Jeannotte was dominant on faceoffs; winning 60 percent of them and giving LIU control for most of the afternoon. In the cage, Winne made 13 saves and was selected as the Most Outstanding Player of the ECC Championship.

The Pioneers now await word on a potential bid to the NCAA Division II Championship.

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The Pioneer has been notified that two of our writers, Kristen Linsalata and Dorianna Valerio, will be receiving awards from the Press Club of Long Island at its 2015 Media Awards Ceremony on June 4. The Press Club of Long Island’s Annual Media Awards Competition recognizes outstanding work in print, broadcast and online journalism in 2014. Stay tuned for more details about the awards!

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By Michael Otero
Sports Editor

On Wednesday, Apr. 22, the women’s lacrosse team suffered their first loss in over a month to the no. 15 ranked Golden Rams from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Their 11-10 loss ended a nine game winning streak for the Pioneers.

Photo credit: Kimberly Toledo
Photo credit: Kimberly Toledo

The Pioneers found themselves down two goals with just under four minutes remaining and turned on the jets. They sliced the deficit in half when senior midfielder Jenna Pierro found the back of the cage and tied the game with just 28 seconds left on a goal from junior defender Honey Roche. With all the momentum seemingly now with the Pioneers, the Golden Rams made one final charge to end the contest before overtime. With three seconds left, junior attacker Hannah Cowan gave her squad the thrilling 11-10 victory.

The Pioneers hit the road again on Saturday, Apr. 25, to face off against no. 7 ranked Stonehill College. The matchup between the two ranked opponents was very even and the end differential was one single goal.

In the first half, both sides traded goals and were tied at one when sophomore attacker Emily Delaney scored, to put LIU up 2-1. Fellow sophomore Cara Douglas followed that goal with one of her own to push the lead to 3-1. The Skyhawks didn’t panic though; as they quickly went to work and got back both goals to pull even at three going into the break.

The Pioneers came out of the half fresh and aggressive and put up two more goals. Pierro netted a goal while Douglas connected for her second of the afternoon, making it 6-4 in favor of the Pioneers. The Skyhawks, however, responded again. The tag team of senior midfielder Lizzie Lane and junior attacker Caitlin Sweeney evened up the game at six in a 71 second span.

The Pioneers took their third lead of the contest on a goal by sophomore attacker Stefani Vagelatos with just over 10 minutes remaining. Lane continued her spectacular day, as she tied the game and eventually netted the game winner over a nine minute span. The Skyhawks ended up taking the hard fought game by a score of 8-7.

The Pioneers concluded their regular season schedule on Sunday, Apr. 26, when they hosted the Queens College Knights at Bethpage Federal Credit Union Stadium in Brookville, N.Y. The Pioneers made quick work of their opponent, dominating them in every facet of the game and cruising to an 18-1 victory.

LIU Post got three goal performances from sophomore attacker Connor Bird, Pierro, and Delaney and also got a four goal performance from Vagelatos. The Pioneers outshot the Knights by 25, forced 10 more turnovers, and scooped up more ground balls. The Knights’ lone goal came with one second remaining in the contest as they avoided the shutout which would have been the first one of the year for freshman goalie Olivia Kirk.

Head women’s lacrosse coach Meghan McNamara and her squad return to the field on Thursday, Apr. 30, when they are set to host the Lions from Molloy College. Opening face-off is set for 3 p.m.

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By Chloé Margulis
Staff Writer

During the 2014- 2015 academic year, WCWP, the campus radio station, broadcasted a majority of the school football, baseball, and basketball games. In 2013, LIU sports broadcasting occurred regularly, on a daily radio talk show called the Sports Hit List. Once the students broadcasting the show graduated, sports coverage became minimal.

Deandre Wilson and Michael Nicosia calling the plays at multiple sports games.  Photo courtesy of Michael Nicosia
Deandre Wilson and Michael Nicosia calling the plays at multiple sports games.
Photo courtesy of Michael Nicosia

Senior Broadcasting major Deandre Wilson was among one of the few who raised sports broadcasting from the proverbial ashes during this academic year after the crew of sports broadcasters graduated in Spring 2013. Wilson didn’t think he would get into radio, but he became interested after broadcasting his first football game on Sept. 27, 2014.

“I think if you ask Mike Nicosia, he’ll say it was one of our best games too,” Wilson said. “Just from there, that was the point we knew we could do this. And for the rest of the season, we just got it—we had to do our research, but once the plays get going and you’re in the game, it’s amazing.”

Sophomore Accounting major Michael Nicosia attended a meeting in spring 2014 for anyone interested in doing sports broadcasting. Nothing came to fruition at the meeting, especially since the sports broadcasting department was practically empty. As Nicosia’s interest in sports broadcasting grew, he tried to bring more people into the program. The team started with the fall football season, broadcasting almost every game.

“After week two [of the football season], when we found out we couldn’t send our past play-by-play and color commentators on the road, [alumni] Peter Belotti asked myself and Deandre to step up and take over those roles,” Nicosia said.

“We traveled to Merrimack with the team and we were in the stands,” Wilson said. “After that game, we kept going to every game and were even able to interview coaches.”

Nicosia broadcasted play-by-plays, and Wilson covered color commentary during the games. “After our first football game, the sports broadcasting began to boom,” Wilson said.

Dan Cox, WCWP’s director, picked the sports that were broadcasted this semester. He felt football was the most important, especially with Homecoming and LIU Post’s newly built stadium. This year, the department brought in alumni Jeff Crowl and Phil Lebowitz to broadcast the Homecoming game because of it is of great importance to the university.wcwp sports2

Every football game, and most home baseball and men’s and women’s basketball games were broadcasted. “We have done every Pioneer game, except for two basketball games versus NYIT, and a couple that overlapped with football season,” Wilson said. Wilson hopes that the team will broadcast more games next year, especially away games.

Wilson and Nicosia said that they see this program growing. Although many of the establishing broadcasters are graduating this semester as well, including Wilson. “Mike is the cornerstone for the sports department to keep going,” Wilson said.

All students can join the broadcasting team, regardless of major or area of interest. Just head on over to the WCWP station and inquire about becoming a broadcaster. Everyone must go through training, including voice training, learning the board, and how to deal with malfunctions.

Peter Belloti, a WCWP alumnus who currently works at CBS News, “came in and helped us out, training us from the ground up on how to broadcast games, how to look at a play, and then call it,” Wilson said. Stay tuned next semester for more coverage of LIU sports games from WCWP.

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By Joseph Iemma
Staff Writer

In late March, LIU Post’s The Treat Shoppe, located across from the Campus Concierge desk in Hillwood Commons, faced health code violations from the Nassau County Department of Health for lacking a required permit.

Photo by Ashley Ioveno
Photo by Ashley Ioveno

“A business that wishes to provide food service in Nassau County is mandated to have a certain amount of sinks and other amenities in order to sustain an adequate mark of health and cleanliness,” according to Lawrence E. Einstein, the Commissioner of the Nassau County Department of Health. “According to our records, at the time [of a recent inspection], Post’s Treat Shoppe was not meeting our standards.”

Tamir Dayya, the Special Projects Manager who manages The Treat Shoppe, and his team were taken back by the news, and worked quickly to remedy the issue. “We had work done in the back of The Treat Shoppe. The university itself installed the number of sinks needed,” he said. With the necessary instillations made, Dayya was puzzled by the violation until he realized that the appropriate paperwork had not been filed with the Department of Health.

“Due to a bureaucratic error, The Treat Shoppe’s permit was never processed,” said David Sollors, LIU’s Assistant Counsel and Compliance Officer. “LIU became aware of this during an inspection by the County’s Office of Food Protection in the ordinary course of business that resulted in a violation for lacking a permit.”

“LIU provided the Nassau County Health Department with all necessary documentation to obtain a permit,” Sollors said. “The Health Department found the papers to be in order, and issued a preliminary permit to continue operating The Treat Shoppe. A final permit is expected to be issued, pending a final inspection of The Treat Shoppe.”

Photo by Ashley Ioveno
Photo by Ashley Ioveno

“We simply never received the proper documentation. However, after notifying the university, we soon received all the proper documentation from Post and the instillation company. Post has always complied with our health standards,” Einstein said.

Dayya said that he believes in operating a business built on integrity and honesty. He said that he manages his business for one sole purpose: to provide students with the opportunity to work in a small business, and see exactly what comes with running a business.

“Most of the students working [in The Treat Shoppe] want to go in to business for themselves one day, and this Shoppe, this program, allows them to gain hands-on experience with running a business and everything that goes with it such as overhead, dealing with consumers, and marketing a product; [these] are some things our students work hands on with,” Dayya said. He also mentioned that any profit the store makes goes to Post’s scholarships funds.

The violation never caused The Sweet Shoppe to close for business. “[The Treat Shoppe] is doing better every day, and next semester we are looking into adding a smoothie maker,” Dayya said.